Business Innovation in Second Life

If you’re interested in how Second Life can be used in business, global engineering and electronics giant Siemens has a page with an excellent video and link to their even more informative island in Second Life.

Collaboration is the core of PLM and the heart of how UGS PLM Software does business. To enable collaboration through Global Innovation Networks, UGS PLM Software develops and leverages 3D modeling, visualization, and collaboration technologies. Virtual environments like Second Life are a natural and exciting extension of these technologies. Through Siemens Innovation Connection, our customers and our partners are experimenting with these new collaboration and visualization technologies. We are working together to explore how these technologies can be utilized to improve business processes and innovation. Siemens Innovation Connection also provides an exciting way to share some of our customer’s innovative products.Siemens Innovation Connection in Second Life

See also Siemens On The Road To Rhythmeering

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4 Comments »

  1. csven said

    More and more this seems to be a Siemens/UGS vs Dassault battle. Which means PTC is an acquisition target by a third party out there somewhere.

    Question on my mind is: who’s the small player that’ll spoil all their fun. There’s always one. Qwaq?

  2. Laurence said

    PTC is a pretty roboust outfit, why do think they can’t challenge the big two?

    I think what may happen is that several smaller players will prevent the giants from dominating the ecosystem. Although I don’t know the relative strengths and weaknesses of these players well enough yet, it seems that gaming and even less demanding solution spaces(Second Life is an example) might provide some check and balance. Should be interesting no matter what.

    >Qwaq?
    Well, I really hope that they are one of the small players that catches this wave but as I’ve said elsewhere, there may not be sufficient energy in the Croquet community for this to happen.

  3. csven said

    It’s not that I don’t think they can’t challenge them, it’s that I don’t think they’ll resist an attractive takeover bid which I suspect will come eventually. If I’m not mistaken, UGS was already bigger than PTC prior to their acquisition by Siemens. Now you’ve got PTC with a market cap of around $2B in competition with Siemens which has a market cap of over a $100B. It’s becoming a *very* big boys’ game.

    Dassault is closer to PTC in market cap, but they have what I believe (based on admittedly less information than I’d like) to be a better situation:

    – SolidWorks is a solid competitor to Pro/E (and too many CAD people *still* don’t know Pro/E is priced competitively)
    – CATIA is considered higher-end than Pro/E and is used in the transportation industry (similar to UGS’s offerings)
    – CATIA has a new version and reportedly more competitive pricing rolling out right now that’s generating some interest (and it includes subD modeling from what I’ve read)
    – Dassault is taking initiatives in online 3D whereas PTC seems to be lagging in this regard
    – Dassault’s P/E is significantly higher than PTC’s, so apparently I’m not alone in thinking Dassault is poised for some growth.

    That’s not to say that Dassault might not also find itself being acquired, but I just don’t see that happening right now; at least not to the degree I see PTC being on someone’s radar.

    In general, I think we’re still looking at a few major shake-ups before we start seeing some convergence, so this might be a 10- or 20-year evolution before we see meaningful convergence with what is now the low-end side of the equation. But I plan on being around. And hopefully in that time the Croquet community will have matured enough to provide that energy.

  4. csven said

    btw, I should add that I’m avoiding comparing PTC’s and Dassault’s PLM offerings.

    First off, I’m not qualified as I’ve only used WindChill and that was a long time ago now.

    Second, I’m surprised by what I believe to be the relatively slow adoption of PLM applications by the mainstream.

    This past year I was finally hearing from friends and clients that their company was investing in PLM. So it’s too soon, imo, to get a good read on how that’s working for the masses.

    The PR feeds and articles are interesting, but I don’t entirely trust them; I prefer hearing what the grapevine has to say and it’s only now starting to provide information. Maybe next year I’ll have a better feel.

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